Monday, 19 May 2008

Simon Revell at Pfizer gets Enterprise RSS

Great to see someone else getting Enterprise RSS - in an interview in ComputerWorld, Simon Revell, Pfizer's manager of enterprise 2.0 technology, talks about the value of RSS:

"Pfizer is about to go live with an enterprise RSS suite for its R & D employees, he added.

'RSS has huge potential,' he noted. 'Even if you ignore doing any of the other things in this space in the enterprise ...RSS has a role to play. We have a whole bunch of content inside of Pfizer that we want to expose. We have a lot of internal Web sites, Internet sites and apps. And anyone in any role has to touch quite a few of them in their work. The newest version of [Microsoft's] SharePoint is completely RSS enabled so ... every single piece of SharePoint can be exposed. Users can see when folks are reading content.'

In addition, unlike email where people can get bogged down by correspondence they don't really want or need to read, RSS allows people more control over what content they consume and how they consume it, he added.

'[The enterprise RSS suite] is a social solution very similar to BlogLines where you can see what other people are subscribing to and how they react to it," he added. 'That fuels the social aspect of it.'"

Pfizer already have an established wiki ("Pfizerpedia") and are also looking social networking.

1 comment:

  1. Hi James,

    You're right, it's refreshing to see a business as large as Pfizer 'getting' enterprise RSS. I think it's the first step in the movement of pharma into the Health 2.0 space.

    As I begin to dig into the state of pharma and Health 2.0, it's quite stunning how far we have yet to go.

    For tightly regulated pharma, I believe getting the internal communities sharing is an effective first step. Then I'd like to see them listen to the social web for conversations about their brands. At some point, they'll then be able to enter into the conversations...

    Meanwhile the key to the whole venture is RSS and the willingness to break down silos internally first, then externally.

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